Ensemble East at St Peter Mancroft, 7pm on Saturday 30 July 2022

I

Ensemble East is coming to Norwich
The Chamber Orchestra will be making its debut performance in Norwich on Saturday 30th July at the church of St. Peter Mancroft.

The programme includes the highly talented horn player Lynne Roberts and rays of Italian sunshine from Mendelssohn’s Symphony No.4.

Beethoven Coriolan Overture Op 62
Richard Strauss Horn Concerto No. 1
Mendelssohn Symphony No.4 “Italian”

Lynne Roberts –  Horn
Philip Hesketh – Conductor

Beethoven Coriolan Overture Op 62
Briefly, Coriolanus is resolved to make war on Rome (in C minor), his Mum pleads for him not to (in E flat major), he resolves not to, but it’s too late, so he kills himself! Rather fatuous plot …. But fabulous music.
Strauss Horn Concerto no 1
This, well known, concerto will be performed by our own principal horn, Lynne Roberts. Strauss grew up in a house full of horn music as his father was a well-known virtuoso; this work shows a true understanding of the heroic nature of the instrument that is a joy to hear.
Mendelssohn Symphony No.4 “Italian”
The Italian symphony is, in effect, a musical postcard home from Italy from the young Mendelssohn The buoyant and optimistic mood within which the work immediately begins bears all the hallmarks of a happy young man, eager to make his mark on the world and express his travels through music.
We hope you will be able to join us. Tickets from Ticketsource here or on the door.
 

Assembly House Classical Summer Series

At The Assembly House, Theatre Street, Norwich

The summer season of Assembly House Classical  lunchtime concert series continues this coming Thursday 21 July, 1pm when the popular soprano LISA CASSIDY with pianist JENNIFER WALSH give a recital of songs by Benjamin Britten, Debussy, Poulenc and Samuel Barber’s wonderful song cycle Knoxville; Summer of 1915.

Two weeks later, on Thursday 4 August, cellist MAX CALVER makes a welcome return with pianist KUMI MATSUO to play Prokoviev’s C major Cello Sonata and Schumann’s Fantasiestucke Op 73

Tickets £20 on the door or online at  www.assemblyhouseclassical.co.uk

The Assemble House is a wonderful Georgian building in the centre of Norwich, next to Norwich Theatre Royal and across the road from the Forum. It is a sparkling example of Georgian splendour where you can have lunch or afternoon tea as well as listen to fabulous music.

Norwich Baroque play a special concert on Saturday 25 June 7pm at St Peter Mancroft honouring John Garth and featuring Kate Bennett Wadsworth

John Garth 300: a celebration for one of England’s best-kept secrets

You may already love Baroque music, in which case definitely do not miss this concert with the excellent cellist Kate Bennett Wadsworth. If you are not so sure, this is an excellent opportunity to find out more with this beautiful and exciting programme of music in Norwich.

Entitled ‘English with a dash of Italian’ it is a fiery cross of Italian baroque with earthy English folk music. Come and find out what that means at the concert this weekend. You can buy tickets on the door, or preferably beforehand online or by phone – see below.

www.ticketsource.co.uk/norwichbaroque
Tel. 0333 666 3366 or on the door (cash, cheque, or card)

Saturday 25 June, 7pm
St Peter Mancroft
Hay Hill, Norwich NR2 1QQ
Tickets: £18/£17 (£2 under 18s)

There is a confession to make. The cellist in that picture is not actually our hero John Garth, but the Anglo-Italian cellist, James Cervetto (1748-1837), the son of the legendary Italian virtuoso cellist Giacobbe Cervetto (1680-1783), who is pictured here in the chair next to him. There is a secretive little smile on James’ face as he demonstrates a fancy new cello technique – as though his father is spluttering “how…how are you doing that?” and he is pretending not to hear the question.

It is hard to imagine Georgian cello playing without the captivating mystique of Italian virtuosi. At the same time, England’s own rich traditions of music and dance combined with the Italian dazzle in ways that made its art music unique. This programme combines both elements, with music by Antonio Vivaldi, John Playford, Richard Mudge, Charles Avison channeling Scarlatti, and of course Mr. Garth himself. Come and join us and enjoy the humour and fun of Georgian England with Italian seasoning!

Norwich Door to Door 30 Years celebration concert

Saturday 7 May 2022, 7pm
St Peter Mancroft Church, Hay Hill, Norwich
30 Years – Let’s Celebrate
with The London Soprano and Norwich Pops Orchestra

Join us for a varied programme of popular classics and songs from the shows by these well-loved and eminent musicians from Norwich, including the Poringland Singers, playing alongside The London Soprano,
Joanne McGahon.  

Tickets priced from £15 are available from Eventbrite
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/261231980887 or by phone (via the Door to Door website http://www.doortodoor.org.uk). 

For more details please call or email us.
Norwich Door to Door, Bowthorpe Road, Norwich NR2 3TU
01603 776735 community@norwichdoortodoor.org.uk

Norwich Door to Door is a Norwich-based charity that celebrates 30 years of success in 2022. Year-round, the charity provides a friendly and reliable door to door community transport service to residents of Norwich and its districts.  

They offer people with limited mobility the opportunity to remain independent and involved within the community.

For those that have difficulty using other forms of transport, their accessible minibuses help people get to medical appointments, day centres, clubs, shops, lunches or to meet with friends or family.

They have a fleet of 13 minibuses equipped with tail-lifts, steps, secure anchor points for wheelchairs and scooters, as well as friendly, trained and DBS checked driver and assistants to ensure comfort and safety.

The success of the charity depends on its volunteers, sponsors and fundraising to provide the service.

Every year they organise fundraising events to support their work. This year they celebrate their 30th anniversary with a special concert at St Peter Mancroft Church, opposite the Forum in Norwich.

Tickets priced from £15 are available from Eventbrite
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/261231980887 or by phone (via the Door to Door website http://www.doortodoor.org.uk). 

For more details please call or email us.
Norwich Door to Door, Bowthorpe Road, Norwich NR2 3TU
01603 776735 community@norwichdoortodoor.org.uk
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/261231980887

Echoes of Ellington at The Halls Norwich

Saturday 19th March 2022, 7.30pm
St Andrew’s Hall

DUKE ELLINGTON: The Best of the Sacred Concerts

Singers – Louise Marshall, Mary Carewe and Cleveland Watkiss
Tap dancer – Bradley Wray
Narrator – Revd Richard Lawry
Norwich Philharmonic Chorus conducted by David Dunnett
Echoes of Ellington Jazz Orchestra conducted by Pete Long

Here is an article by Tony Cooper

Norwich Philharmonic Chorus concert in Norwich

Looking forward to hearing the Norwich Philharmonic Chorus give their first public performance for nearly 2 years with the wonderful Petite Messe Solennelle by Rossini at St Andrew’s Hall, Norwich, on Saturday 6th November.

Because of CoVid restrictions on space, the work will be performed in its original version with the choir and 4 guest soloists accompanied by two pianos and harmonium rather than the orchestra. It’s neither petite nor solemn but really very lovely. So do come and listen!


Tickets are £18, £17, £12 unreserved (£7 for students/Under 26’s). Available online at www.ticketsource.co.uk/norwichphil

Two concerts at The Chapel, Park Lane, Norwich

Herewith details of two further Chapel concerts, programmed by Roger Rowe.

The distinguished soprano Carolyn Sampson, well known for her work with historically informed performances and Masaaki Suzuki’s famed Bach Cantata performances, gives a mouth watering concert preview with Matt Wadsworth, of her Wigmore Hall live stream later this month. 

The Mark Viner concert next Sunday is fully booked,  returns only – there are just a few seats left for the 6th September Beethoven cello Sonata series.

Lovely to be back with live music – do try it! Roger  

Sunday August 30th at 1pm & 4pm    

Returns  only

 MARK VINER (piano)

 Beethoven: Piano Sonata No 27 in E minor Op 90
Liszt:  Die Zelle in Nonnenwerth, elegie, S.534
Alkan: Trois petites fantaisies, op.40
Liszt: Hymne a Sainte Cécile de Charles Gounod, S.491
Deux Légendes, S.175
1. St. François d’Assise  2.  St. François de Paule marchant sur les flots

 

Sunday 6th September at 3pm & 6.30pm 
A few seats still available 

RICHARD TUNNICLIFFE cello  &  MAGGIE COLE piano

Beethoven Cello Sonatas I
Sonata No 1  in F major Op 5/1
Seven Variations on Mozart’s “Bee Mannern, welche Liebe fühlen”
Sonata No 4 in C  major Op.102/1

Sunday 20th September at 6.30pm
Booking now open

Wigmore Preview

CAROLYN SAMPSONsoprano    MATT WADSWORTH lute

Music Everywhere

A programme of  favourite  17th century songs, touching all corners of society, from plaintive folk songs and ballads to the genius and depths of Dowland, Johnson and Purcell. 

Music that was played and heard, in the street, at home, in religious settings and in the theatre.  

At the centre of the programme is Echos in air by Laura Snowden – a wonderfully hypnotic work for solo theorbo, written for Matthew Wadsworth in 2019.

Sunday 18th October at 3pm & 6.30pm 

Booking now open

MITHRAS PIANO TRIO

Haydn: Piano Trio in E flat in E major XV;28
Tchaikowsky: Piano Trio in A minor Op 50

Review: Currie and Reich – The Colin Currie Quartet Norwich Playhouse Monday 20 May NNFestival 2019

Colin Currie Group at Kings Place 2018Currie and Reich – The Colin Currie Quartet
Norwich Playhouse Monday 20 May NNFestival 2019
a review by Marion de Mello Catlin

The Colin Currie Quartet played a blinder last night in Norwich Playhouse. I didn’t know about them before the concert and was interested to go to a performance that was all percussion based as the percussion section rarely gets the glory in an orchestra, and I also like the music of Steve Reich. The Playhouse was packed with not a spare seat in the house – great to see such a turnout – obviously many people better informed than me!

The Quartet was formed fairly recently in 2018 by Colin Currie who is clearly completely passionate about percussion and the Quartet. After the first piece (Mallet Quartet by Joseph Perreira) he introduced the Quartet and explained that the composer Steve Reich was very important to the raison d’être of the quartet and that the works pivot around his compositions, with two pieces in the programme by Reich.

It was really helpful to have an in-depth but concise explanation of the basis of each piece, especially for those if us who are not familiar with this kind of music. I wish that more musicians would do that – Currie was good at it. The stage was full with instruments I hadn’t seen before – marimbas it turns out – two with long pipes and two with shorter, 4 musicians each with two ‘lollipop’ drumsticks in each hand, four per person. At times, the playing was so complex and blended that it was hard to discern the source of the sound. The marimbas’ deep tones flowed together, especially the bass instruments and sounded almost electronic.

Colin played a couple of numbers on his own Xenakis’ Rebonds B for solo percussion and Stockhausen’s Vibra-Elufa. Together they played Kevin Volans Four Marimbas and Reich’s Mallet Quartet before the last piece Reich’s Drumming Part 1.

The speed rhythm and energy was impressive throughout the evening, though none of the first 5 pieces could come near the finale piece Drumming Part 1 composed by Steve Reich. It was like the Olympics of percussion in its performance and virtuosity. Colin explained the basis of the piece, a simple (on its own) basic rhythm underpinning the whole piece beaten out on 8 tuned drums, again 4 musicians working together and in relays. The same 12 notes as a single rhythm repeated which, as an audience member was a godsend at times as it enabled me to find a point to return to and steady path throughout. Colin explained phasing and how the notes interlock and rotate around each other which really helped the appreciation of the piece.

Musically it was interesting, visually it was fascinating – watching the percussionists work in waves, first all together then periodically standing back, their arms working at blurring speed throughout. Physically, it was a feat of musicianship, almost unbelievable and breathtaking technical skill rivalling the most extreme of acrobats, daredevil motorcyclists or   demanding magical coordination and muscular energy. I can’t tell you exactly that it was a lovely piece of music as I was bewitched and hypnotised by the technical skill. After what seemed an eaon of blurred arms and drumsticks, they reached a crescendo and then instantly stopped with a resounding and precise ‘crack’, absolutely as one. In the drumming Olympics, then there is absolutely no doubt that they ran away with the Gold.

If you missed it, or want to listen to a sample there’s a YouTube link below but I would recommend catching a live performance if you ever get the chance. The Quartet is new and this is their debut programme so it is worth watching out for more as they add to their repertoire – they have an amazing future I am sure and hopefully will be back in Norwich before too long.

https://youtu.be/KmlbuRGubrI
https://www.colincurrie.com/news/2018/8/3/colin-currie-quartet

Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music at John Innes Centre Sunday 7 April 3pm

 

9jamesehnes_148_c_ben_ealovega

Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music Club presents…

Sunday 7 April 2019, 3pm

James Ehnes, violin
Andrew Armstrong,
piano

Beethoven

Violin Sonata in D, Op.12 No.1
Violin Sonata in A, Op.12 No.2
Violin Sonata in A minor, Op.23
Violin Sonata in E flat, Op.12 No.3

(The cycle will be completed next season, 2019-2020)

James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong begin their journey through the Beethoven violin sonatas with the first four works of the series. The triptych, Op.12, shows the young composer’s style at its most wilfully subversive, from the energy of the opening work and the elegant wit of the middle sonata to the dazzling virtuosity of the last in the series. More mysterious and subdued is the highly compressed A minor Sonata Op.23.

Pre-concert talk by Misha Donat 1.45pm

http://www.norwichchambermusic.co.uk/event/james-ehnes-andrew-armstrong/