Britten Sinfonia : Alison Bolsom : An American Rhapsody

Sunday 14 November 2021

Norwich Theatre Royal, Theatre Street, Norwich NR2 1RL

Photographer: Hugh Carswell

Alison Balsom trumpet
Tom Poster piano
Nicholas Daniel cor anglais
Scott Stroman conductor
Britten Sinfonia 

Programme to include:
Rodrigo arr. Gil Evans/Miles Davis Concierto de Aranjuez
Copland Quiet City 
Gershwin arr. Simon Wright  Rhapsody in Blue 
Ives The Unanswered Question

Britten Sinfonia joins forces with star trumpeter Alison Balsom in a concert harnessing the power and legacy of Miles Davis and the enduring musical influence of the Jazz Age. An arrangement of Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez is punctuated by jazz-inspired works of the 20th century capturing the spirit of New York: Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue, infused with the rhythms and noises of the modern city, and Copland’s evocative Quiet City.

Ticket prices: £35, £28, £20, £15, £10

Norwich Philharmonic Chorus concert in Norwich

Looking forward to hearing the Norwich Philharmonic Chorus give their first public performance for nearly 2 years with the wonderful Petite Messe Solennelle by Rossini at St Andrew’s Hall, Norwich, on Saturday 6th November.

Because of CoVid restrictions on space, the work will be performed in its original version with the choir and 4 guest soloists accompanied by two pianos and harmonium rather than the orchestra. It’s neither petite nor solemn but really very lovely. So do come and listen!


Tickets are £18, £17, £12 unreserved (£7 for students/Under 26’s). Available online at www.ticketsource.co.uk/norwichphil

Two concerts at The Chapel, Park Lane, Norwich

Herewith details of two further Chapel concerts, programmed by Roger Rowe.

The distinguished soprano Carolyn Sampson, well known for her work with historically informed performances and Masaaki Suzuki’s famed Bach Cantata performances, gives a mouth watering concert preview with Matt Wadsworth, of her Wigmore Hall live stream later this month. 

The Mark Viner concert next Sunday is fully booked,  returns only – there are just a few seats left for the 6th September Beethoven cello Sonata series.

Lovely to be back with live music – do try it! Roger  

Sunday August 30th at 1pm & 4pm    

Returns  only

 MARK VINER (piano)

 Beethoven: Piano Sonata No 27 in E minor Op 90
Liszt:  Die Zelle in Nonnenwerth, elegie, S.534
Alkan: Trois petites fantaisies, op.40
Liszt: Hymne a Sainte Cécile de Charles Gounod, S.491
Deux Légendes, S.175
1. St. François d’Assise  2.  St. François de Paule marchant sur les flots

 

Sunday 6th September at 3pm & 6.30pm 
A few seats still available 

RICHARD TUNNICLIFFE cello  &  MAGGIE COLE piano

Beethoven Cello Sonatas I
Sonata No 1  in F major Op 5/1
Seven Variations on Mozart’s “Bee Mannern, welche Liebe fühlen”
Sonata No 4 in C  major Op.102/1

Sunday 20th September at 6.30pm
Booking now open

Wigmore Preview

CAROLYN SAMPSONsoprano    MATT WADSWORTH lute

Music Everywhere

A programme of  favourite  17th century songs, touching all corners of society, from plaintive folk songs and ballads to the genius and depths of Dowland, Johnson and Purcell. 

Music that was played and heard, in the street, at home, in religious settings and in the theatre.  

At the centre of the programme is Echos in air by Laura Snowden – a wonderfully hypnotic work for solo theorbo, written for Matthew Wadsworth in 2019.

Sunday 18th October at 3pm & 6.30pm 

Booking now open

MITHRAS PIANO TRIO

Haydn: Piano Trio in E flat in E major XV;28
Tchaikowsky: Piano Trio in A minor Op 50

Review: Currie and Reich – The Colin Currie Quartet Norwich Playhouse Monday 20 May NNFestival 2019

Colin Currie Group at Kings Place 2018Currie and Reich – The Colin Currie Quartet
Norwich Playhouse Monday 20 May NNFestival 2019
a review by Marion de Mello Catlin

The Colin Currie Quartet played a blinder last night in Norwich Playhouse. I didn’t know about them before the concert and was interested to go to a performance that was all percussion based as the percussion section rarely gets the glory in an orchestra, and I also like the music of Steve Reich. The Playhouse was packed with not a spare seat in the house – great to see such a turnout – obviously many people better informed than me!

The Quartet was formed fairly recently in 2018 by Colin Currie who is clearly completely passionate about percussion and the Quartet. After the first piece (Mallet Quartet by Joseph Perreira) he introduced the Quartet and explained that the composer Steve Reich was very important to the raison d’être of the quartet and that the works pivot around his compositions, with two pieces in the programme by Reich.

It was really helpful to have an in-depth but concise explanation of the basis of each piece, especially for those if us who are not familiar with this kind of music. I wish that more musicians would do that – Currie was good at it. The stage was full with instruments I hadn’t seen before – marimbas it turns out – two with long pipes and two with shorter, 4 musicians each with two ‘lollipop’ drumsticks in each hand, four per person. At times, the playing was so complex and blended that it was hard to discern the source of the sound. The marimbas’ deep tones flowed together, especially the bass instruments and sounded almost electronic.

Colin played a couple of numbers on his own Xenakis’ Rebonds B for solo percussion and Stockhausen’s Vibra-Elufa. Together they played Kevin Volans Four Marimbas and Reich’s Mallet Quartet before the last piece Reich’s Drumming Part 1.

The speed rhythm and energy was impressive throughout the evening, though none of the first 5 pieces could come near the finale piece Drumming Part 1 composed by Steve Reich. It was like the Olympics of percussion in its performance and virtuosity. Colin explained the basis of the piece, a simple (on its own) basic rhythm underpinning the whole piece beaten out on 8 tuned drums, again 4 musicians working together and in relays. The same 12 notes as a single rhythm repeated which, as an audience member was a godsend at times as it enabled me to find a point to return to and steady path throughout. Colin explained phasing and how the notes interlock and rotate around each other which really helped the appreciation of the piece.

Musically it was interesting, visually it was fascinating – watching the percussionists work in waves, first all together then periodically standing back, their arms working at blurring speed throughout. Physically, it was a feat of musicianship, almost unbelievable and breathtaking technical skill rivalling the most extreme of acrobats, daredevil motorcyclists or   demanding magical coordination and muscular energy. I can’t tell you exactly that it was a lovely piece of music as I was bewitched and hypnotised by the technical skill. After what seemed an eaon of blurred arms and drumsticks, they reached a crescendo and then instantly stopped with a resounding and precise ‘crack’, absolutely as one. In the drumming Olympics, then there is absolutely no doubt that they ran away with the Gold.

If you missed it, or want to listen to a sample there’s a YouTube link below but I would recommend catching a live performance if you ever get the chance. The Quartet is new and this is their debut programme so it is worth watching out for more as they add to their repertoire – they have an amazing future I am sure and hopefully will be back in Norwich before too long.

https://youtu.be/KmlbuRGubrI
https://www.colincurrie.com/news/2018/8/3/colin-currie-quartet

Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music at John Innes Centre Sunday 7 April 3pm

 

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Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music Club presents…

Sunday 7 April 2019, 3pm

James Ehnes, violin
Andrew Armstrong,
piano

Beethoven

Violin Sonata in D, Op.12 No.1
Violin Sonata in A, Op.12 No.2
Violin Sonata in A minor, Op.23
Violin Sonata in E flat, Op.12 No.3

(The cycle will be completed next season, 2019-2020)

James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong begin their journey through the Beethoven violin sonatas with the first four works of the series. The triptych, Op.12, shows the young composer’s style at its most wilfully subversive, from the energy of the opening work and the elegant wit of the middle sonata to the dazzling virtuosity of the last in the series. More mysterious and subdued is the highly compressed A minor Sonata Op.23.

Pre-concert talk by Misha Donat 1.45pm

http://www.norwichchambermusic.co.uk/event/james-ehnes-andrew-armstrong/

Jazz at Anteros : Bahla – Imprints Album Tour Friday 2 February 2018

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=FI6gDctWYhw

Bahla – Imprints Album Tour
at Anteros Arts Foundation, Fye Bridge Street, Norwich NR3 LJJ
Friday 2nd February 2018

Formed by Venezuelan pianist Joseph Costi and English guitarist Tal Janes, London based group Bahla break new ground with their mix of cinematic jazz entangled with Jewish folklore. Interested in how migration and displacement shapes cultures, their debut album Imprints finds a way to embrace multiculturalism. Across the album, a distinctive palette is underset by a bold and dynamic rhythm section, while radiant vocals – echoing the modal form of Jewish prayer music – rise and fall over searching,
delicate melodies on keys and guitar.

Bahla are:
Ines Loubet – Voice/Percussion
Tal Janes – Guitar
Joseph Costi – Piano/Keys
Andrea Di Biase – Double Bass
Ben Brown – Drums
Doors 7pm   Music starts 7:30pm
Tickets £8   Ticket link: https://www.anterosfoundation.com/music

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New edition of Music in Norwich is out!

Please to say that the newest edition of Music in Norwich is now out on the streets in hard copy and is available to pick up free from the Tourist Information Centre, Theatre Royal, St Andrew’s Hall, Norwich Cathedral, Arts Roundup racks and many other place around Norwich and Norfolk as well as a pdf download from this siteMusic in Norwich spring 17.jpg