Music in Norwich : Three concerts this weekend 15 June 2019

Saturday 15th June : Mancroft Music : Julian Haggett : St Peter Mancroft : 1pm

Organ recital by the organist at St Peter Mancroft


Saturday 15th June : St Peter Mancroft  Church : 7.30pm
Mozart Orchestra
SUMMER CONCERT

Weber Bassoon Concerto
Schubert Symphony No 5 in B flat major
Beethoven Symphony No 3 in E flat ‘Eroica’

Soloist Paul Killby
Conductor  Tadeusz Kaznowski
Leader  Fiona Hutchins

A performance of the Eroica Symphony is always special, but teamed with the less frequently heard Bassoon concerto by Weber and Schubert’s 5th Symphony, said to have been written during a period of particular infatuation with Mozart’s music, our summer concert offers a treat for the ears.


Saturday 15th June : Norwich Cathedral  : 7.30pm
HAYDN : The Creation

Norwich Cathedral Chamber Choir
Norwich Cathedral Players

Katherine Crompton Gabriel
Gareth Treseder Uriel
Edward Grint Raphael

Ashley Grote Conductor

Tickets £10 – £28 (£5 for U18s in side aisles)

Norwich Cathedral Chamber Choir & Players

Assembly House Classical presents Benjamin Baker Thursday 13 June 1pm

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Thursday 13 June 2019, 1pm

Benjamin Baker violin

Ysaye Sonata No 2 in A minor, Op 27 No 2 ‘Obsession’
JS Bach Partita No.2 in D minor, BWV 1004

Full details, programme and booking details here
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/benjamin-baker-violin-tickets-52954946671

Sistema concert tonight Sat 8 June with special guest Ephrain Oscher

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Saturday 8 June 7pm Noverre Suite, Assembly House
SISTEMA COMPOSERS with Efraín Oscher
£7 Full / £5 Concs / £4 Sistema Parents, Under 16s FREE
Tickets available on the door

Next in the series of concerts for the Sistema Performance Project, this time with the Venezuelan composer and flautist Efrain Oscher and Sistema musical director Juan Gabriel Rojas. The performers are the Teen Sistema orchestra who have been learning for nearly ten years and are now accomplished musicians.

If you have never heard of Sistema then you might want a bit of background.

Sistema started in Norwich ten years ago. You may have heard them in the early days when they had just been given instruments – one of the key features of the programme is that children start to play in the orchestra, and in public, right from the very beginning. This meant that some of the early concerts were quite tough listening! However, now with three orchestras of different levels of age and accomplishment, the smaller teen orchestra has been performing on a regular basis, schooled by Juan Gabriel and they no longer sound like school-children. If you have not attended a Sistema concert recently I think you will be very pleasantly surprised at the quality and range of the music.

Originally called In Harmony, the programme was funded by the Government for three years, basing the programme on the very successful El Sistema project in Venezuela which resulted in the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra led by the charismatic Gustavo Dudamel which many people have heard of as they now tour the world.

When Sistema started in Norwich it was in three primary schools in Mile Cross, Larkman and Catton Grove and the whole school played. Now the programme has spread to other schools in the city, concentrating on areas where most children would not otherwise have the opportunity to play. It is a social impact music programme which aims to enable and inspire children through participation in music. It is no longer funded by the government but depends on a range of sources ranging from school budgets, public funding via the Norfolk Music Hub and Arts Council, trusts and funds such as the Freeman’s Charity, Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music Club and Chivers Trust and business sponsors such as Art Angels, The Rees Consultancy and Culture Shift. It also depends on donations and volunteer support.

If you can help in any way, as a sponsor, volunteer or have an instrument to donate, or money – all help is welcome for this valuable project which depends on help to keep going, providing free music and instruments to children who would otherwise miss out.

www.sistemanorwich.org.uk

 

Notice: Raynham Hall has regrettably had to cancel recitals this weekend 8/9 June but has Open Days 18 June & 25 July

Raynham Hall Open Day Tours

Discover more about the political and social history of the influential Townshend family during an exclusive 17-room tour of Raynham Hall including the Marble Hall, the King’s Bedroom, designed for the visit of King Charles II, and the Belisarius Room.

The tours, led by Lord and Lady Townshend, are peppered with their personal anecdotes and the stories about this glorious stately home and its residents.

The 90 minute tours are held from 10am-3.30pm Tuesday 18 June, Thursday 25 July

The next Raynham Recital will be in September – details below

The September Weekend – September 7th & 8th 2019

Saturday 7th at 6.30pm: Rachel Podger has played both baroque and classical violin at Raynham and is returning with her regular harpsichord accompanist Marcin Światkiewicz, a newcomer to Raynham. Their programme includes music of the late C16th to very early C18th: Fontana, Leonarda, Corelli, JS Bach, Veracini & Frescobaldi.

Sunday 8th at 3.30pm: this afternoon concert of Renaissance and Baroque music is presented by a sparky trio of musicians playing solo and in duet and trio combinations. Tabea Debus – recorder & cello, Louise Ayrton – violin & Pawel Siwczak – harpsichord.

 

To book http://www.raynhamrecitals.co.uk or ring 01328 862133
Email admin@raynhamhall.co.uk
Raynham Hall, East Raynham, Fakenham Norfolk NR21 7E

The Marble Hall

Raynham Hall Raynham Hall, near Fakenham, Norfolk

Raynham Hall near Fakenham, Norfolk has been the seat of the Townshend family for over 400 years. Raynham Recitals is a programme of chamber music held in what used to be the great hall of this Jacobean house designed and built by Sir Roger Townshend with his Master Mason William Edge. Later paved in marble by William Kent and embellished in C18th style, the Marble Hall epitomises the dual spirit of Raynham Hall. Lofty, elegant and flooded with light, it also has a clear but gentle resonance which is perfect for the intimate chamber music presented at the Raynham Recitals.

Musical Advisor: Michael Chance CBE

Review: Currie and Reich – The Colin Currie Quartet Norwich Playhouse Monday 20 May NNFestival 2019

Colin Currie Group at Kings Place 2018Currie and Reich – The Colin Currie Quartet
Norwich Playhouse Monday 20 May NNFestival 2019
a review by Marion de Mello Catlin

The Colin Currie Quartet played a blinder last night in Norwich Playhouse. I didn’t know about them before the concert and was interested to go to a performance that was all percussion based as the percussion section rarely gets the glory in an orchestra, and I also like the music of Steve Reich. The Playhouse was packed with not a spare seat in the house – great to see such a turnout – obviously many people better informed than me!

The Quartet was formed fairly recently in 2018 by Colin Currie who is clearly completely passionate about percussion and the Quartet. After the first piece (Mallet Quartet by Joseph Perreira) he introduced the Quartet and explained that the composer Steve Reich was very important to the raison d’être of the quartet and that the works pivot around his compositions, with two pieces in the programme by Reich.

It was really helpful to have an in-depth but concise explanation of the basis of each piece, especially for those if us who are not familiar with this kind of music. I wish that more musicians would do that – Currie was good at it. The stage was full with instruments I hadn’t seen before – marimbas it turns out – two with long pipes and two with shorter, 4 musicians each with two ‘lollipop’ drumsticks in each hand, four per person. At times, the playing was so complex and blended that it was hard to discern the source of the sound. The marimbas’ deep tones flowed together, especially the bass instruments and sounded almost electronic.

Colin played a couple of numbers on his own Xenakis’ Rebonds B for solo percussion and Stockhausen’s Vibra-Elufa. Together they played Kevin Volans Four Marimbas and Reich’s Mallet Quartet before the last piece Reich’s Drumming Part 1.

The speed rhythm and energy was impressive throughout the evening, though none of the first 5 pieces could come near the finale piece Drumming Part 1 composed by Steve Reich. It was like the Olympics of percussion in its performance and virtuosity. Colin explained the basis of the piece, a simple (on its own) basic rhythm underpinning the whole piece beaten out on 8 tuned drums, again 4 musicians working together and in relays. The same 12 notes as a single rhythm repeated which, as an audience member was a godsend at times as it enabled me to find a point to return to and steady path throughout. Colin explained phasing and how the notes interlock and rotate around each other which really helped the appreciation of the piece.

Musically it was interesting, visually it was fascinating – watching the percussionists work in waves, first all together then periodically standing back, their arms working at blurring speed throughout. Physically, it was a feat of musicianship, almost unbelievable and breathtaking technical skill rivalling the most extreme of acrobats, daredevil motorcyclists or   demanding magical coordination and muscular energy. I can’t tell you exactly that it was a lovely piece of music as I was bewitched and hypnotised by the technical skill. After what seemed an eaon of blurred arms and drumsticks, they reached a crescendo and then instantly stopped with a resounding and precise ‘crack’, absolutely as one. In the drumming Olympics, then there is absolutely no doubt that they ran away with the Gold.

If you missed it, or want to listen to a sample there’s a YouTube link below but I would recommend catching a live performance if you ever get the chance. The Quartet is new and this is their debut programme so it is worth watching out for more as they add to their repertoire – they have an amazing future I am sure and hopefully will be back in Norwich before too long.

https://youtu.be/KmlbuRGubrI
https://www.colincurrie.com/news/2018/8/3/colin-currie-quartet

Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music at John Innes Centre Sunday 7 April 3pm

 

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Norfolk & Norwich Chamber Music Club presents…

Sunday 7 April 2019, 3pm

James Ehnes, violin
Andrew Armstrong,
piano

Beethoven

Violin Sonata in D, Op.12 No.1
Violin Sonata in A, Op.12 No.2
Violin Sonata in A minor, Op.23
Violin Sonata in E flat, Op.12 No.3

(The cycle will be completed next season, 2019-2020)

James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong begin their journey through the Beethoven violin sonatas with the first four works of the series. The triptych, Op.12, shows the young composer’s style at its most wilfully subversive, from the energy of the opening work and the elegant wit of the middle sonata to the dazzling virtuosity of the last in the series. More mysterious and subdued is the highly compressed A minor Sonata Op.23.

Pre-concert talk by Misha Donat 1.45pm

http://www.norwichchambermusic.co.uk/event/james-ehnes-andrew-armstrong/

Assembly House Classical Lunchtime concert Thursday 28 March 1pm

 

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19 Year Old Saxophonist ROB BURTON – one of the stars of the BBC YOUNG MUSICIAN 2018 – will be in Norwich on Thursday 1pm for one of the Assembly House classical lunchtime concerts. Those of us who watched the televised final last year will not forget Rob’s charismatic performance. He brings with him pianist CHRISTINE ZERAFA for an exciting programme details below;-

Music Room, Assembly House, Norwich
Thursday March  28 at 1pm

Tickets on the door or online www.assemblyhouseclassical.evenbrite.com

Rob Burton (saxophone) & Christine Zerafa (piano)
BBC YOUNG MUSICIAN 2018

Programme
Debussy; Saxophone Rhapsodie
Paul Creston; Saxophone Sonata Op.19
Marcello; Concerto in D minor
Robert Planel; Prelude et Saltarelle
Pedro Iturralde; Pequena Czarda

https://www.robburtonsax.co.uk/
https://www.oxfordlieder.co.uk/artist/223

Brook Street Band Anniversary Concert

Tatty Theo & Carolyn Gibley celebrate the 20th anniversary of their first concert together with a programme of Handel & Geminiani with some additional Burns Night surprises – do come along. 

Full details of the chapel series for 2019 can be viewed  onwww.norwichchapelconcerts.org.uk R

The Chapel, 64 Park Lane, NR2 3EF

  www.norwichchapelconcerts.org.uk

Tickets £15 on the door – under 25 free

Friday January 25 at 7.30pm

Brook Street Band Anniversary                                                                              Tatty Theo – baroque cello
Carolyn Gibley – harpsichord 

Handel; Cello Sonata in G major & Sarabande from Suite in G minor  
Cervetto; Cello Sonata in A minor Op 2/5
Geminiani; Prelude from Pieces de Clavecin  
Handel; Cello sonata in D minor   &   Lascia ch’io pianga
Geminiani; Cello Sonata in C major Op 5/3

www.brookstreetband.co.uk

 

Norwich Baroque with cellist Richard Tunnicliffe

Saturday 12 January 2019 7.30pm
Norwich Central Baptist Church, Duke Street, Norwich 

Richard Tunnicliffe cello    

Start your New Year with us as we welcome back cellist, Richard Tunnicliffe, a well-known name in the early music world and someone who has been a significant figure in our development as a group. 

A programme of early Classical music including Haydn’s cello concerto in C and music by CPE Bach, JC Bach and Mozart.

We would love to have the hall filled with excited young cellists, so we are inviting any cellist aged 18 or under to come FREE of charge… no catch or small print at all.

Either book via the Theatre Royal tel: 01603-630000 or just turn up on the door to claim your free ticket. (Cannot be booked via the on line booking system .. too complicated!). 

PLEASE do forward to any young cellists…and consider coming yourself too?As well as the Haydn Cello concerto, Richard will be directing the programme from the cello.. good for the youngsters to see it doesn’t always have to be the violinists who lead!